All Ages and Abilities Cycling Network

Two people bicycle on the Harbour Road bicycle lanes.

Thank you to everyone who provided feedback on cycling routes in James Bay!

The design consultation process closed on June 11th. Over 1300 respondents participated in our digital survey and provided input through our virtual mapping tool. An additional 250 people participated in virtual meetings and provided written submissions. We appreciate you taking the time to get involved.

Designs for cycling routes in James Bay were approved by Council in August 2021. You can find the engagement summary report under "additional documents and resources".

About the Network

The City is building a 32km network of All Ages and Abilities (AAA) cycling infrastructure to improve road safety and provide affordable transportation options for residents. Our goal is to provide safe, comfortable connections for people who want to ride more often or who are concerned about safety to access schools, parks, community centres, regional trails, and destinations throughout our community. The Cycling Network plan was adopted in 2016.


Thank you to everyone who provided feedback on cycling routes in James Bay!

The design consultation process closed on June 11th. Over 1300 respondents participated in our digital survey and provided input through our virtual mapping tool. An additional 250 people participated in virtual meetings and provided written submissions. We appreciate you taking the time to get involved.

Designs for cycling routes in James Bay were approved by Council in August 2021. You can find the engagement summary report under "additional documents and resources".

About the Network

The City is building a 32km network of All Ages and Abilities (AAA) cycling infrastructure to improve road safety and provide affordable transportation options for residents. Our goal is to provide safe, comfortable connections for people who want to ride more often or who are concerned about safety to access schools, parks, community centres, regional trails, and destinations throughout our community. The Cycling Network plan was adopted in 2016.


You ask, we answer

Do you have any questions about the proposed designs or the corridors that are open for input? Ask them here and project staff will answer them as soon as possible, within 3 business days.

Please do not share any personal information as the questions and answers will be visible by the public. You will receive notification when your question is answered.

You can also direct questions or comments to engage@victoria.ca and your email will be forwarded to the appropriate staff member for response.

You need to be signed in to add your question.

  • I am curious what efforts the city is putting towards making these streets accessable to all citizens? The city has already run into this before, making curbside and bus stops dangerous to access for the visually impaired and those with mobility aids. By taking away parking, will handicap parking spots be established, and how will the bus stops and curbs where the cars park be safe to access? By reducing the number of parking spaces and making bus stops difficult to access, those who live on these streets and use these bus stops will now have a constant stress. Second, had there been data if the recent bike lanes have reduced traffic in Victoria? Is there actual data showing an increase of cyclists and decrease in cars?

    Emily230 asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for the questions. 

    Each capital project provides an opportunity to improve accessibility in the City. Examples may include improved curb let downs, widened sidewalks, new seating, accessible traffic signals or tactile warning domes. Additional accessible parking stalls in James Bay can be implemented at any time. The City has developed updated design guidelines in 2021 and is currently collecting feedback from different users on locations to add more designated stalls. Council has allocated $500,000 over the next several years to retrofit the existing supply and add new stalls. If you have specific suggestions of locations for new accessible parking stalls on any of the four corridors, please provide these comments in the survey. We also encourage you to talk to private landowners or strata councils in James Bay if you would like to see additional accessible stalls at places like apartment buildings, shopping centres or office buildings. 

    There are no new floating bus stops on any of the designs shown. The alternative to removing on-street parking would be removing boulevards and street trees. If your preference is to retain parking and remove the trees, please provide these comments in the survey. 

    With respect to transportation data, the City and CRD collect mode share, trip distance, and vehicle ownership rate information every 4 – 5 years. The next results will be ready in 2022 and 2023. In the meantime, you can see real time cycling use data on any of the regional counters here. With a growing city and limited physical space, we don’t have options to build new roads. Just like our sidewalk networks or transit network, our goal is to create a connect cycling network that will provide more travel options for residents and visitors.

  • According to an answer below re "suicide" lanes on Richardson Street, Advisory Bike Lanes are no longer being pursued. Why are they being suggested in James Bay. They are an accident waiting to happen. Especially on streets where time is of the essence such ass near schools & Urgent Care centres. What is the logic for using them in James Bay and no longer on Richardson Street?

    Mo99 asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for the question. Different design solutions, including protected bike lanes, shared-use neighbourhood bikeways, and advisory bike lanes, have been explored for James Bay. All design treatments fit the local context and roadway characteristics while meeting needs of different road users. The revised designs of advisory bike lanes in some segments in James Bay are a response to public feedback we heard in the first round regarding vehicle circulation and on-street parking. We encourage you to try out advisory bike lanes on Humboldt Street!

  • Where or how do I find the video on cycling in James Bay?

    Ljhow74 asked 7 months ago

    Great question!

    The video can be found on the right hand side of the page, at the top. You can also access the video here

    Thanks!

  • Glad to see this moving forward again. Regarding the advisory lanes on Government from Belleville to Superior, will those go in before construction on the separated lanes starts? Will you implement bike-specific signals at Belleville and Government?

    parrystreet asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for the question!

    The sequencing of the advisory bike lanes will be determined in coordination with a contractor who will be managing the site. It may be advantageous for some sections to be completed for construction in advance of others for cost saving benefits. 

    The Belleville and Government intersection is planned to receive phased improvements given the notable underground infrastructure, adjacent site improvements and surface paving scheduled for the following years. Bike signals will be explored in conjunction with other notable pedestrian and cyclist safety improvements. The plans presented highlight interim/temporary intersection safety improvements for 2022 with notable signal work and additional pedestrian / cyclist safety improvements reserved for the future improvements.

  • Hi there, did I not read there is a place to 'vote' on this site between Michigan and Superior? Please advise.

    CRDLIFE asked 7 months ago

    Hi there,

    Thanks for the question. We have just launched the final round of engagement for cycling routes in James Bay, and invite you to review the revised designs and fill out the survey, in which you will be asked about your east-west preference for a cycling route, Michigan or Superior. All input will be shared with Mayor and Council. Thanks for participating!

  • I live in one of the apartment buildings on Michigan St. and Menzies, but didn't have the opportunity to participate in the discussion. My concern is with the proposed bike lane competing with residential parking. Considering the number of residents that don't have access to parking stalls, and the higher population density of Michigan St. with apartment complexes, it'd be a callous decision to eliminate or halve the residential street parking space and suggest we park... where? Beyond Superior St. being the continuation of bike infrastructure that is already coming from the legislature, it is a wider street than Michigan, so if it can accommodate two way traffic, bike lanes, and still have nearly the same amount of street parking, that seems like the logical choice. I'm skeptical that there are people in this city who's only barrier to using a bicycle for transportation is not feeling safe unless they are in a dedicated bike lane. Bike lanes are for a very particular demographic that likely already ride. But even then, if the city insists on having bike lanes in residential areas, why not just simply make Superior a one-way Westbound, and Michigan a one way Eastbound? One way streets are safer for cyclists on shared roads (this is the point of the bike lanes, right?), and this way parking is not eliminated. I'm an avid two-wheeler, and use active transport when it is convenient, but I'm not going to be lulled out of a parking space by overzealous green development goals, either. Independent car and truck ownership that is affordable to the average citizen can and should be part of a free and environmentally responsible society, and there is growing resentment that bike lanes have an ulterior motive by those that are pushing for them. Encouraging alternative forms of transportation is different than systematically making driving and owning a vehicle that is not a bicycle as difficult as possible. Will the city take this into account or are our councillors' hands tied?

    Evelyn91 asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for your comments. The city’s limited right of way means there will always be trade-offs to provide space to accommodate cars, bikes, buses, horse and carriages, parking, loading, and other uses like boulevards and street trees. Please note that the goal is to prioritize either Michigan or Superior as a part of this capital initiative, not both.  

    Establishing additional one-way roads was not something that was widely suggested during the first round of public consultation – in fact, we heard clearly about the importance of vehicle circulation within James Bay. Based on feedback from the first round of engagement, staff have been revising design concepts. Updated designs and a final round of public engagement will launch in May 2021. At that point, you will have another opportunity to provide feedback, design suggestions and weigh in on all routes. Please check back to stay involved. 

    To answer your question – the City is encouraging increased use of transit, walking and cycling. These policies are supported in our Official Community Plan as well as in Go Victoria, our city-wide mobility strategy. Establishing safer routes for people on bicycles supports more people riding, more often. We are also making investments in sidewalks and crosswalks, public transit shelters, accessible parking, new loading zones, public EV charging stations and shared mobility options, as we know all modes of transportation need to be accommodated to support our growing community. 

  • I am curious what the latest plan is for the Richardson Street AAA bicycle lanes? Has the plan been changed from a single "suicide" lane due to the considerable criticism that it has received? Unfortunately I was never able to participate in the public consultation because I never received any invitation to do so, yet my condo is on the corner of Richardson(!)

    VanIsleBorn79 asked 8 months ago

    Thank you for the question. Advisory bike lanes, which use a single travel lane and painted bike lanes on either side of the road which allow vehicles to legally cross over when they are passing, are not being pursued. The City is also not pursuing protected bike lanes (either one-way or two-way) due to feedback about on-street parking loss, the level of protection for cyclists (breaks in the protection) and limited pedestrian benefits. 

    Instead, a shared road neighbourhood bikeway design has been adopted. There are no bike lanes -- cyclists and motorists simply share the road. The approved design includes traffic diverters, speed humps, and reduced speed limits to achieve a 30km / hr design speed and segments with 1,000 vehicles per day. The project also includes Improved pedestrian crossings, new sidewalks, road paving, a neighbourhood plaza, landscaping and additional on street parking in select areas. Preliminary road paving and underground infrastructure replacement is currently underway throughout spring 2021 and construction of the full project is anticipated for summer and fall of 2021. 

    The design process was completed between July 2019 and February 2020. More than 2,000 people were involved in the public engagement period in the fall of 2019. Opportunities for feedback were promoted through print and social media advertisements, neighbourhood associations, email announcements, on-street signage. There were also several radio and TV stories covering the process. People participated through surveys, public open house events, walking tours, and at pop-up information stations. 

    We encourage you to stay connected to this site to participate in future consultation activities and to get involved in your Neighbourhood Association to stay connected with the latest news about land use, transportation, parks and recreation in the City of Victoria. 

     

  • I am a property owner on Michigan street but confined to Alberta until safe to travel. There is simply not enough room for a bike lane on Michigan to compete with cars plus the need for street parking on Michigan. I was a day late to take the initial survey concerning bike lines. There should have been more time allotted for out-of-province owners to become aware of this survey particularly during a pandemic.

    DM2864 asked 8 months ago

    Thanks for the question. The City will be continuing to gather feedback on routes and design in late April and May 2021. Stay tuned for more information – you have not missed the opportunity to weigh in.  

  • Will the changes to Government St. planned for between Belleville and Superior coincide with work taking place from Superior to Dallas or will these two large projects occur separately?

    Citizen 79 asked 9 months ago

    Thanks for the question. The City is open to different approaches to construction as long as access is maintained into the neighbourhood. The work from Belleville to Superior is likely to involve interim treatments that could potentially be delivered in tandem with the rest of the corridor between Superior and Dallas. Once plans are finalized and construction is complete at the Royal BC Museum, a more permanent treatment will be rolled out in that block.

  • I am a long-time and current homeowner in James Bay. I am also an avid cyclist and ride for transportation and for sport almost every day (and cycle indoors at home for training too!). Like many others, I am strongly opposed to any significant changes to the roads in and around the area. While designated bike routes are helpful, no changes are needed. Is there any way to stop this plan from infiltrating our community or has the City already determined that it will proceed regardless of the many concerns raised, which are evident on your project page?

    citizen85 asked 9 months ago

    Thanks for your question. The initial design consultation phase is intended to gather feedback on route preferences and design concepts for James Bay. Part of the goal is to get early feedback so that staff can continue to work with agency partners and stakeholders to refine and adapt. You are correct that the City is not consulting on whether or not to invest in road safety improvements. The 32km cycling network was approved in 2016 and is intended to support new riders, young riders, older riders or those who want to ride more but are concerned about safety. The goal is to establish a network of connected routes – just like our transit network for buses or our road network for cars. As a growing City with limited space, we must find ways to give more people more transportation options, allowing people who want to drive or need to drive to continue to do so. All design recommendations are brought forward to Council and are part of public meetings. Stay tuned to Victoria.ca for more information or sign up for our monthly e-news to get updates on these and other projects in your neighbourhood. We also suggest you stay connected to the James Bay Neighbourhood Association to keep apprised of further land use and transportation feedback opportunities.

Page last updated: 08 November 2021, 11:14